Thursday, January 21, 2016

Book Giveaway

I'm running another book giveaway on Goodreads, starting January 27.

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Getting the Best of Your Dissertation by Dave  Harris

Getting the Best of Your Dissertation

by Dave Harris

Giveaway ends February 04, 2016.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

Friday, December 4, 2015

Last Day of My Book Giveaway

I'm running a giveaway to promote my book. Today (December 4) is the last day to sign up!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Getting the Best of Your Dissertation by Dave  Harris

Getting the Best of Your Dissertation

by Dave Harris

Giveaway ends December 04, 2015.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

Saturday, November 21, 2015

Get a Free Copy of My Book!

To promote my book, I'm running a giveaway on Goodreads.

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Getting the Best of Your Dissertation by Dave  Harris

Getting the Best of Your Dissertation

by Dave Harris

Giveaway ends December 04, 2015.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

Monday, August 17, 2015

Finally: My New Book!

When I stopped writing this blog with the intention of turning the material into a book, I had no idea that it would take quite so long, but....
Finally, I have finished and published my book on dissertation writing: Getting the Best of Your Dissertation: Practical Perspectives for Effective Research (or on Amazon: Getting the Best of Your Dissertation)
I suppose it's unnecessary to say that I think it has a novel and useful take on the issues related to dissertation writing, even despite the fact that I think there are lots of good dissertation books out there that have lots of good ideas. And despite the fact that pretty much every dissertation book that I like makes a point that I repeat, which is that to write a dissertation, you want to write every day.
Now that I've written this one book, will I blog more? Who knows? It's not as if there are any regular followers of my blog after being idle for so long.
I've got at least two more books already in the works, and hopefully I'll get them to completion a bit faster than I did this first one.

Monday, August 1, 2011

Problems with for-profit education

I have a client who is getting terrible advice and direction from his academic advisors at a for-profit university. All my clients, of course, are having trouble--they wouldn't come find me if they weren't. But it seems to me that the students at for-profit schools get hit the hardest--they pay the most and get the least support, and the least useful support. I do not mean to suggest that all for-profit schools are doing their students a disservice, but I think that some are.

A for-profit school has, at best, a mixed incentive to graduate its students: every student who doesn't graduate will pay fees for the next semester. Of course graduating students helps you promote your business to future clients, but still--on the principle that a bird in the hand in worth two in the bush--for-profit schools have an incentive to keep students from graduating.

For-profit schools also have an incentive to cut resources spent on educating students to a minimum--the lower the costs, the higher the profit. Of course, to the extent that there are accreditation boards, there is a bar of quality over which all schools must pass, but there is incentive to stay as close to the bar as possible.

For-profit schools, it must be kept in mind, are intended to make a profit. That is a strong incentive which necessarily guides the decisions made by for-profit schools. There may be other motivations guiding them, but their desire to make a profit is necessarily central. And it's an aim that competes with the aim of educating people.

In public education, the aim of the school (ideally) is to educate people to contribute to the common good. Of course there may be corrupt people within the public education system who are trying to work that system for their own gain, and thus detract from the resources spent on the students, but then again, it's not as if for-profit companies are free from individual malfeasance.

I guess I would say that if you're thinking of giving your money to a for-profit school, you might well benefit from seeing if there are any public universities that offer comparable programs.

I have worked with students who did have helpful faculty at their for-profit school, but the worst I've ever seen at a real school (public, or private non-profit) is far above what I've seen at the for-profit schools. The quality of the feedback received by the client who prompted this post is really atrocious--in three rounds of submission, he has gotten useful feedback twice, but once the useful feedback was followed by direction that was absolutely indefensible from any scholarly perspective.

If you're having trouble at your for-profit school, I can help, and I'll charge less than your school.

Thursday, July 7, 2011

When it rains, it pours.

Sometimes things happen in groups. The old saying "bad things come in threes," comes to mind. We, perhaps, remember the bad things more readily than the good. Do good things also come in threes? or fours? or pairs?

Currently, it seems like I'm having one of those groupings with all sorts of "bills" coming due at once. Not actual bills (well, those, too, and having those contributes to the sense of lots happening at once), but occasional costs, all happening to hit at once. I had to replace my computer last week (it was 4.5 years old), and the software. And then my backpack died (it was about 9 years old). And then my glasses broke (3 years old). Then the annual auto registration is also due this month. And I was hoping to take a short vacation (which would cost extra $$ over my normal expenditures).

And I was thinking about how such basically random events sometimes all happen at once, and then we maybe feel like everything is falling apart, when it just happens that it was a random grouping of events, each of which was individually basically certain.

It's not a sign of things breaking down. It's just random chance serving up a double helping of difficulty.

Of course, when the sun shines, things are good: just as there are confluences of negative events that make for occasional difficult weeks, there are confluences of things working right that make for weeks that go by easily. We don't necessarily notice those weeks, though. I clearly remember places in Tolkein's work where he says "but stories of good times are quickly told," I suppose that's at work here: the stories of good times are more easily told. This reminds me of the value of having some practice of stating what you're grateful for or what is good in your life: if you want to remember the good, sometimes you have to work for it.

Sunday, July 3, 2011

What I write about when I write about what I think about when I'm running.

Among other things, I think of annoying extensions/alterations of Murakami's title (which itself is an adaptation of of a Raymond Chandler title).

What I was thinking, partly, was that I could nearly write a book out of the different thoughts that fill one run--to write them all would take at least as long as the hour or two that I was out running....but probably longer, because turning ideas into structured sentences isn't instantaneous. That assumes that I could even remember all the things that I thought about.

I spent a lot of today's run thinking about how thinking aversive thoughts can make things worse. By thinking about how difficult the thing is, the negative anticipation builds up. And this makes dealing with the thing worse. And how you don't want to remind people too strongly of the unpleasant aspects of things that they have to do.

Also considered were: the question of how soon to start exercise after an injury; what my friend was up to at the moment I passed her house; what route I was going to run; how the same group of people managed to get on the same public volleyball courts every week (you'd think sometimes some else would get there first)...there are too many people passed to wonder at every person's story.
I thought about writing, of course. I thought about how understanding other people's stories is the foundation for writing good fiction. I didn't think this then (or at least not as I remember): understanding other people's stories is the foundation of good communication, generally.

Part of what I thought about while running today was how one of the important tasks for the writer is to filter through all the possible ideas that could be talked about, and to stay focused on topic.